With 2017 behind us and 2018 off to a wintery start, let me tell you how truly grateful I am for the trust placed in us by our clients. Many times over the past year we have helped our clients navigate the often hazardous waters of employment law in New Jersey – and the airways of aviation law.  Clients often come to us in the worst of times. Helping our clients through the tough times is what we do and why we exist. Some examples:

  • The corporate executive fired for informing her superior about safety violations.
  • A small business sued by an employee who made a false complaint to government authorities.
  • The company whose CEO is accused of sexual harassment and an objective investigation is needed to get at the truth.
  • The pilot facing the loss of his license to fly.

I am honored by those who trust our firm to guide them through such problems.

Employment Law:

New Jersey remains a challenging employment law jurisdiction for businesses.  The Law Against Discrimination, Conscientious Employee Protection Act (our whistle blower law), and leave laws provide workers with legal protections as strong as any state in the country.  NJ’s laws also tend to be more employee-friendly than the better known federal laws that dominate in other states, so NJ-specific experience is critical.  Aiding a business requires a four-pronged approach: (1) information and understanding, (2) prevention through sound policies and consistent practices, (3) regular training, and (4) prompt action when problems arise.  We help with all of these.  The course that we urge upon our clients is to keep HR problems out of the courts and within their control when possible.  But when litigation becomes necessary, we’re ready, willing and able.

Aviation Law:

Our aviation practice has been busy in 2017 before the FAA and in the courts.  On the advocacy front, as President of the Mid-Atlantic Aviation Coalition, and now Vice Chairman of the New Jersey Aviation Association, I have fought on the front line of aviation’s struggle to bring sensibility to the overbearing security restrictions that stifle the aviation industry as they accompany the President during his frequent stays in Bedminster. Same with the misleading airline industry push to “privatize” the air traffic control system, a bad deal for both aviation and America.  Our efforts on behalf of aviation have landed us on television, radio, and in print.

The coming year will bring more challenges with a new governor and a different policy approach. His campaign promise of a $15/hour minimum wage, for example, will be controversial.

I hope that 2018 will bring the people of New Jersey opportunities for cooperation, fairness, mutual respect and prosperity. We remain prepared to advise and defend our clients through whatever challenges the coming year — and beyond — may bring.

Frank Steinberg

January 15, 2018